Get Unstuck

 

17 Ways to Bring More Creativity into Your Daily Life and Work

 

In a 2,500-word magazine feature on how to spark creativity in life and business, it’s hard to find creative ways of saying, well, “creativity.” And when writing about innovation, I definitely don’t want to be repetitive. So I half-jokingly asked one of my sources for this story, Keri Smith, author of Mess: The Manual of Accidents and Mistakes and Wreck This Journal, if she had any good synonyms for the word. “Life,” she non-jokingly replied. “I try not to separate the two.”

 

She’s right. Our power to create is what sets us apart from other animals. (OK, the opposable thumb—which allows us to hold a paintbrush!—gets some credit, too.) And it’s important to be reminded of that power, she says. After all, you created your own business, right? Your ability to create—whether it’s a product, a business plan, a website, a piece of art—is infinite and only limited by the rules you impose upon yourself.

 

But for most of us, creativity has become cut off from our regular lives. Maybe we paint or journal or write songs as a hobby, but that seems to be where creativity—or at least our idea of it—stays. In today’s marketplace, however, “anyone who works with their mind is required to be creative on a daily basis,” says Todd Henry, author of The Accidental Creative: How to Be Brilliant at a Moment’s Notice. “We are called upon to solve problems, develop strategies and assemble bits of data into something actionable. These are all creative acts, though they’re not often recognized as such.” So what good does it do to relegate our innate creativity to a hobby? How much more dynamic, successful and fun could your business be if you cultivated your creativity? Here are 17 ideas to get you started.

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Get Unstuck | 2012-02-06 | SUCCESS Magazine | Your Personal Development Resource.

The Global Achievement Gap « MythGinger

Tony Wagner has written a thought-provoking book on the state of education – something that concerns any parent and employer. How do we shift from an industrial model to one that produces the creativity and innovation our current economy requires? This is a major shift that is required by all academic institutions in order to compete in today’s global marketplace. The primary focus is on ‘one student at a time accountability’ as opposed to ‘test-score accountability’. Maximizing the potential of each and every student. Wagner emphasizes that learning and citizenship in the twenty-first century demands that each student knows how to think – to reason, analyze, weigh evidence and problem solve and to communicate effectively. “These are no longer skills that only the elites in a society must master; they are essential survival skills for all of us.”

A direct attack on ‘teaching to the tests’, Wagner pushes for a new attitude in education. A welcome breath of fresh air in academe. If you care about teaching or how your children are taught, this book is required reading.

The Global Achievement Gap: Why Even Our Best Schools Don’t Teach the New Survival Skills Our Children Need–and What We Can Do About It

via The Global Achievement Gap « MythGinger.